Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

2201 SW 152nd Street, Suite #3
Burien, WA 98166
USA

Hunter’s Handbook is the official student “how-to” information pipeline of the International Hunter Education Association. As the experts in teaching safe, ethical and successful hunting, we are here to provide tips, tools, and great video content as well as offer you a place that you can learn more about your love and favorite past-time—hunting.  Spend some time with us.  New content is added monthly, and we are excited to share our expertise with you.  We wish you a lifetime of safe and memorable experiences in the outdoors.

Camo and Clothing

camo & clothing

brands we use and trust


CAMO AND CLOTHING EDUCATION

HOW TO BEAT THE COLD WHILE HUNTING During January of 2014, a polar vortex brought below-zero temperatures to the Midwest, and that deep freeze coincided with Ohio’s late muzzleloader season. While most of us (myself included) were hiding from the cold close to a raging fire, some hunters, like Chad McKibben, were out in the elements in search of deer. And, in McKibben’s case, braving the elements paid handsomely.

HOW TO BEAT THE COLD WHILE HUNTING

During January of 2014, a polar vortex brought below-zero temperatures to the Midwest, and that deep freeze coincided with Ohio’s late muzzleloader season. While most of us (myself included) were hiding from the cold close to a raging fire, some hunters, like Chad McKibben, were out in the elements in search of deer. And, in McKibben’s case, braving the elements paid handsomely.

LAYERING: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO AVOID THE KILLER COLD On the day I was sitting and writing this, much of America was locked into a deep and raw freeze. For the second winter in a row, temperatures in January have dipped into the teens in some areas as far south as Texas and well below zero in the Dakotas and upper Midwest. It’s cold out, the snows are piling up, and the winds are raw. It’s winter.

LAYERING: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO AVOID THE KILLER COLD

On the day I was sitting and writing this, much of America was locked into a deep and raw freeze. For the second winter in a row, temperatures in January have dipped into the teens in some areas as far south as Texas and well below zero in the Dakotas and upper Midwest. It’s cold out, the snows are piling up, and the winds are raw. It’s winter.

LAYERING YOUR WAY TO WARMTH IN THE STAND OR BLIND At this point in the season and beyond, the temptation is great to wear too much gear from the moment we leave the vehicles or the cabin. I succumbed to the temptation just recently on a late season duck hunt on a small, flowing river deep in the bottom of a forested, brush-choked valley. The air temp was single digits, so I geared up in the heaviest waders and warmest parka. By the time I set foot in the flowing creek the first time, I was sweating my own river.

LAYERING YOUR WAY TO WARMTH IN THE STAND OR BLIND

At this point in the season and beyond, the temptation is great to wear too much gear from the moment we leave the vehicles or the cabin. I succumbed to the temptation just recently on a late season duck hunt on a small, flowing river deep in the bottom of a forested, brush-choked valley. The air temp was single digits, so I geared up in the heaviest waders and warmest parka. By the time I set foot in the flowing creek the first time, I was sweating my own river.

STAY SAFE AND PROTECTED: THE IMPORTANCE OF LAYERING When Mother Nature throws you a curveball, you need to be prepared. Savvy hunters understand that proper gear and time spent in the woods are the keys to success. Athletes who take for granted the importance of preparation are likely to leave the field early when the weather turns nasty.

STAY SAFE AND PROTECTED: THE IMPORTANCE OF LAYERING

When Mother Nature throws you a curveball, you need to be prepared. Savvy hunters understand that proper gear and time spent in the woods are the keys to success. Athletes who take for granted the importance of preparation are likely to leave the field early when the weather turns nasty.