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2201 SW 152nd Street, Suite #3
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Hunter’s Handbook is the official student “how-to” information pipeline of the International Hunter Education Association. As the experts in teaching safe, ethical and successful hunting, we are here to provide tips, tools, and great video content as well as offer you a place that you can learn more about your love and favorite past-time—hunting.  Spend some time with us.  New content is added monthly, and we are excited to share our expertise with you.  We wish you a lifetime of safe and memorable experiences in the outdoors.

Thompson Center: deer rifles

You’ve passed hunter education. Now all you think about is deer hunting. You catch yourself daydreaming about deer hunting, where you’ll go, what you’ll do, the rifle you’ll carry. What if you had your pick among all the deer rifles? Where would you even begin? What would you look for in your deer rifle?

If you go into a store and ask to see deer rifles, you’ll likely be shown row after row of rifles of various calibers, action types and barrel and stock configurations. If a parent or your hunter education class hasn’t helped you decide, discuss options with your instructor or hunting mentor. Your local firearm dealer can also help pick a rifle that fits your needs and skill set. “Ideally, you can go to a range with a friend or relative and try different firearms and see what is best suited for you,” said Danielle Sanville, brand manager of Thompson/Center Arms Company. Just be sure to check regulations to determine which types of firearms are legal for the season you intend to hunt, she said.

thompson/center : deer rifles

Joe Arterburn

 

You’ve passed hunter education. Now all you think about is deer hunting. You catch yourself daydreaming about deer hunting, where you’ll go, what you’ll do, the rifle you’ll carry. What if you had your pick among all the deer rifles? Where would you even begin? What would you look for in your deer rifle?

If you go into a store and ask to see deer rifles, you’ll likely be shown row after row of rifles of various calibers, action types and barrel and stock configurations. If a parent or your hunter education class hasn’t helped you decide, discuss options with your instructor or hunting mentor. Your local firearm dealer can also help pick a rifle that fits your needs and skill set. “Ideally, you can go to a range with a friend or relative and try different firearms and see what is best suited for you,” said Danielle Sanville, brand manager of Thompson/Center Arms Company. Just be sure to check regulations to determine which types of firearms are legal for the season you intend to hunt, she said.

Fit is important, Sanville said. “Most adults will find our ‘standard size rifles,’ whether bolt-action, single-shot or muzzleloaders, are sized to fit most shooters,” she said. “However, if you are a smaller-frame shooter or youth shooter, Thompson/Center offers several models with shorter or adjustable-stock options a shooter may find helpful.”

“For example, the Venture Compact and Dimension bolt-action rifles and Impact muzzleloader feature adjustable stocks that allow the shooter to add or remove spacers to lengthen or shorten the stock to suit the individual needs. It is a perfect way for a smaller-framed shooter or youth hunter to grow into a gun. These spacers can also come in handy to change length of pull if a change is needed due to heavy layering of clothes in colder weather.”

Among Thompson/Center’s offerings are bolt-actions, single-shot break-actions and muzzleloaders, all of which are “easy to use, reliable, accurate and easy to clean,” Sanville said. “Bolt-actions are the most common centerfire rifle design which allows the shooter to carry multiple rounds in the gun for quick follow-up shots. Single-shot rifles and muzzleloaders can also be reloaded in the field and take a little longer to reload, but they also offer an added measure of safety (the gun essentially unloaded after the round is fired), as well as the precision and excitement of the ‘one shot challenge.’” 

Rifle stocks are usually made of wood or synthetic materials, both of which can be good options for hunters, Sanville said. “Most T/C guns are offered in a synthetic option because this material is light weight and durable. However, if you are a fan of hardwood, we offer this option in our T/C Encore Pro Hunter and T/C G2 Contender interchangeable models. Wood can require more care but can also offer a great feel, look and beauty to the firearm.” 

“For many big game hunting situations, you will want a scope on your rifle,” Sanville said. “T/C firearms are all drilled and tapped for scope bases and some models come with the base already installed.” Again, check regulations to make sure scopes are allowed in your area, she said. Sanville recommends visiting www.tcarms.com to see a full selection of bases and rings.

What about barrel length? What length is most accurate? “Barrel length has less to do with accuracy and more to do with the feel and balance of the firearm or optimizing the performance of the cartridge,” Sanville said. “Thompson/Center’s master gunmakers have designed the barrel lengths and style of each rifle to fit the unique needs of the shooter and cartridge. Each barrel design is exhaustively tested—some T/C firearms come with a Minute of Angle accuracy guarantee—right out of the box.”

Your caliber choice will largely be determined by what game you are hunting and what you feel comfortable shooting, Sanville said. “Generally, a .243 is considered a good deer caliber for a first-time hunter or someone who doesn’t want a lot of recoil,” she said. Going up in size, there are many other good choices, she said. And in muzzleloaders, 50 caliber is the standard choice.

There is a lot of satisfaction in choosing the right rifle. “If a hunter has chosen a firearm that fits their size, ability and game they are pursuing, they should expect that gun to perform safely and last a lifetime with proper care and maintenance,” Sanville said. “A well-designed firearm should be intuitive to operate and handle naturally. The balance and how a gun ‘points’ are all things to consider. You want to feel comfortable and confident in your firearm so you can achieve an ethical and quick kill.”

For more information about Thompson/Center firearms, visit www.tcarms.com.