Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

2201 SW 152nd Street, Suite #3
Burien, WA 98166
USA

Hunter’s Handbook is the official student “how-to” information pipeline of the International Hunter Education Association. As the experts in teaching safe, ethical and successful hunting, we are here to provide tips, tools, and great video content as well as offer you a place that you can learn more about your love and favorite past-time—hunting.  Spend some time with us.  New content is added monthly, and we are excited to share our expertise with you.  We wish you a lifetime of safe and memorable experiences in the outdoors.

Thermacell Saves the Day on Texas Teal Hunt

When Matt Coffey of Ducks Unlimited said to bring a Thermacell for the teal hunt we were planning on the Texas Gulf Coast in September I did a double-take. Being from Nebraska, I don’t normally associate duck season with mosquitos. Even our earliest duck seasons are usually preceded by mosquito-killing frost or at least insects aren’t typically much of a concern when I dig out waders and decoys.

So, I checked with outfitter Bink Grimes. He confirmed: Bring a Thermacell. We’re not in Nebraska anymore, Toto.

 

Thermacell Saves the Day on Texas Teal Hunt

By Joe Arterburn

When Matt Coffey of Ducks Unlimited said to bring a Thermacell for the teal hunt we were planning on the Texas Gulf Coast in September, I did a double-take. Being from Nebraska, I don’t normally associate duck season with mosquitos. Even our earliest duck seasons are usually preceded by mosquito-killing frost, or at least insects aren’t typically much of a concern when I dig out waders and decoys.

So, I checked with outfitter Bink Grimes. He confirmed: bring a Thermacell. We’re not in Nebraska anymore, Toto.

The plan was to base out of Grimes’ Sunrise Lodge on Matagorda Bay (matagordasunriselodge.com) and hunt ducks on nearby areas of the Texas Prairie Wetlands Project, a partnership of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The hunt was made more interesting by Hurricane Harvey, which earlier had blown through Texas, making landfall about 80 miles southwest of Matagorda, and causing torrential rainfall (as much as 52 inches in some areas), flooding, and tidal surges. In addition to massive destruction, all that water created widespread habitat for waterfowl, which rode out the storm in good shape and, in mosquito-speak, ideal breeding conditions.  

 

“They’re fierce,” Taylor Abshier, DU biologist for a 28-county area along the Texas Gulf Coast, said of the mosquitos. “They are definitely worse than normal.” The mosquito population, he said, “definitely blew up after the storm.”

On the evening of our arrival, we got a taste of the mosquito situation and they got a taste of us. Our parking lot introductory gathering shifted inside as the sun went down and mosquitos attacked in squadrons.

 

The next morning, stepping out of our vehicle to unload the Yamaha Viking which would ferry us along dikes to our hunting spot, mosquitos showed up in force—and hungry. Just putting on chest waders was a challenge, what with trying to swat and brush away the blood-thirsty throng that hovered, well, everywhere, from ground level to well overhead. I fired up my Thermacell (a new MR450 model) and clipped it to my wader belt.

Every step in the knee-high grass stirred up a mist of mosquitos and brushing against any sort of tall weed or brush brought forth a cloud of reinforcements. At our first stands, Grimes used a can of insecticide to fog the thin cedars behind which we sat on stick-in-the-mud stools. That gave us a head start against the skeeters and my Thermacell kept the rest at bay. Not a bite.

Morning no. 2 was similar, but I had my Thermacell up and running as I stepped out of the vehicle, before I put on my waders. We waded across a knee-deep pond to hide behind a grassy, mosquito-y dike. No insecticide fogging this time, but my Thermacell was up to the task. Sitting on a stool in the water of one pond looking over the dike at the decoys set in the next pond, I sat my Thermacell in the grass next to the box of Blind Side shotshells, in front of me. And forgot about mosquitos, especially as sunrise brightened the sky and teal began to buzz the decoys.

For more information go to www.Thermacell.com