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2201 SW 152nd Street, Suite #3
Burien, WA 98166
USA

Hunter’s Handbook is the official student “how-to” information pipeline of the International Hunter Education Association. As the experts in teaching safe, ethical and successful hunting, we are here to provide tips, tools, and great video content as well as offer you a place that you can learn more about your love and favorite past-time—hunting.  Spend some time with us.  New content is added monthly, and we are excited to share our expertise with you.  We wish you a lifetime of safe and memorable experiences in the outdoors.

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Predator

Predators present fundamental danger, whether it be to humans or other wildlife. This is what makes hunting them not only a challenge, but a public service contribution. Coyotes, foxes, mountain lions, bobcats, feral hogs, bears, and snakes are all considered predators. Its important to check your states hunting guidelines and adhere to all the important safety measures before you plan your hunt. 

Predators present fundamental danger, whether it be to humans or other wildlife. This is what makes hunting them not only a challenge, but a public service contribution. Coyotes, foxes, mountain lions, bobcats, feral hogs, bears, and snakes are all considered predators. Its important to check your states hunting guidelines and adhere to all the important safety measures before you plan your hunt. 

JUST FOR KIDS - PREDATOR HUNTING SAFETY TIPS Do you know the first thing to do before you go predator hunting and what to do when you return from your hunt? It’s important to take extra caution when hunting with kids, but even more so while hunting predators in a group. Shooting in groups requires specific ways to sit to ensure everyone is safe and the shooter has a clear view. You’ll want to protect yourself and others from diseases that animals can carry. Hunter orange may not be required, but should you wear it? 

JUST FOR KIDS - PREDATOR HUNTING SAFETY TIPS

Do you know the first thing to do before you go predator hunting and what to do when you return from your hunt? It’s important to take extra caution when hunting with kids, but even more so while hunting predators in a group. Shooting in groups requires specific ways to sit to ensure everyone is safe and the shooter has a clear view. You’ll want to protect yourself and others from diseases that animals can carry. Hunter orange may not be required, but should you wear it? 

CRITICAL COYOTE HUNTING TECHNIQUES Coyotes are widespread and highly adaptable predators, and in many areas coyotes feed heavily on deer and other game species. One of the best ways that you, as a hunter, can help preserve wild game is to reduce predator populations. Coyotes can offer a challenging hunt after deer season has ended.

CRITICAL COYOTE HUNTING TECHNIQUES

Coyotes are widespread and highly adaptable predators, and in many areas coyotes feed heavily on deer and other game species. One of the best ways that you, as a hunter, can help preserve wild game is to reduce predator populations. Coyotes can offer a challenging hunt after deer season has ended.

CAUTION: PREDATOR APPROACHING Many predator hunters go afield without thinking about the scenario in which they will be a central figure. The scenario is this: the camouflaged hunter conceals herself or himself in a remote location, in this case let’s say in rural Texas, where both coyotes and bobcats are common. Sitting virtually motionless, the hunter produces a sound with mouth call or electronic call, usually imitating a distressed rabbit or other small animal in hopes of drawing in a coyote or bobcat looking for an easy meal.

CAUTION: PREDATOR APPROACHING

Many predator hunters go afield without thinking about the scenario in which they will be a central figure. The scenario is this: the camouflaged hunter conceals herself or himself in a remote location, in this case let’s say in rural Texas, where both coyotes and bobcats are common. Sitting virtually motionless, the hunter produces a sound with mouth call or electronic call, usually imitating a distressed rabbit or other small animal in hopes of drawing in a coyote or bobcat looking for an easy meal.